7 Million Lives to Save/Vaccine Here

Health

7 Million Lives to Save/Vaccine Here

VACCINE TO SAVE MILLIONS

Kenya is the first African country to introduce the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine which has been tailored to meet the needs of children in developing countries. Pneumococcal disease currently takes the lives of over a million people every year - including more than half a million children before their fifth birthday. Eleven years ago, Tabitha lost her oldest child to pneumonia, a disease that kills 30,000 young lives in Kenya every year. SOUNDBITE (Kiswahili) Tabitha Mwikali, Mother:“When I took him to the doctors, that’s when I discovered it was pneumonia. My child was sweating a lot, having shocks. It was like that his whole body was being pierced by something. He was admitted for one month, and at the end of the month my child died.”Recently, the vaccine to prevent these diseases --once only available in rich countries – was officially introduced to the African continent. Kenya is the first African country to introduce this vaccine which has been tailored to meet the needs of children in developing countries. At the vaccine’s global roll-out event in Kenya, the country’s President joined mothers, health workers, donors and partners to witness the formal introduction of pneumococcal vaccine into Kenya’s routine immunization program.SOUNDBITE (English) Mwai Kibaki, President, Kenya:“I am pleased to announce that the government is committed to making this new program sustainable. We will provide this life-saving vaccine free of charge with every child that is under 1 year old in all public health centres.” If the vaccine can be introduced to more developing countries, it’s estimated that up to seven million children’s lives can be saved by 2030.


Transcripts / Production notes / Scripts

Eleven years ago, Tabitha lost her oldest child to pneumonia, a disease that kills 30,000 young lives in Kenya every year.

SOUNDBITE (Kiswahili) Tabitha Mwikali, Mother:
“When I took him to the doctors, that’s when I discovered it was pneumonia. My child was sweating a lot, having shocks. It was like that his whole body was being pierced by something. He was admitted for one month, and at the end of the month my child died.”

Recently, with the support of the GAVI Alliance, the vaccine to prevent pneumococcal diseases - once was only available in rich countries - is being officially introduced to the African continent.

Kenya is the first African country to introduce the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine which has been tailored to meet the needs of children in developing countries.

At the vaccine’s global roll-out event in Kenya, the country’s President joined mothers, health workers, donors and partners to witness the formal introduction of pneumococcal vaccine into Kenya’s routine immunization programme.

SOUNDBITE (English) Mwai Kibaki, President, Kenya:
“I am pleased to announce that the government is committed to making this new program sustainable. We will provide this life-saving vaccine free of charge with every child that is under 1 year old in all public health centres.”

If the vaccine can be introduced to more developing countries, it’s estimated that up to seven million children’s lives can be saved by 2030.

In Kibera, one of Kenya’s largest slums, Tabitha and her fellow mothers all received the good news. Their youngest children will soon join others throughout Kenya, from urban slums to rural villages, to be protected from pneumonia which kills more children than any other causes worldwide.

Details

Language: English

Year of Production: 2011

Length: 2:30 mins.

Country: Kenya

Directors:

  • Mo Sacirbey, Tom Osborne, UNTV

Producers:

  • Susan Sacirbey