Alcohol Abuse/Globally 2,500,000 Die

Health

Alcohol Abuse/Globally 2,500,000 Die

WHO-MILLIONS DYING OF ALCOHOL

A new report launched by the World Health Organization (WHO) warns of the need to combat the harmful impact of alcohol abuse which increasingly affects younger generations and drinkers in developing countries and results in the death of 2.5 million people annually. Most of these deaths result from injuries, cancer, cardiovascular diseases and cirrhosis. The report notes that globally, 6.2 percent of all male deaths are related to alcohol, compared to 1.1% of female deaths. One-in-five men in the Russian Federation and neighboring countries die due to alcohol-related causes. Globally, 320 000 young people aged 15-29 years die annually.


Transcripts / Production notes / Scripts

Dr. Shekhar Saxena, Director, WHO Mental Health and Substance Abuse Department:
“The key finding is that alcohol is giving rise to very large amount of health and social harms. As amny as 2.5 million deaths all over the world can be because of alcohol use.”
3. Cutaway, Dr. Saxena skimming through report
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Shekhar Saxena, Director, WHO Mental Health and Substance Abuse Department:
“Alcohol now is the third leading factor for risk to health and is a major contributor to deaths and disability.”
5. Cutaway, report
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Shekhar Saxena, Director, WHO Mental Health and
Substance Abuse Department:
“One of the highlights of the report is that alcholo consumption is increasing rather rapidly in lower and middle income countries and also the pattern of use is becoming heavier and so giver rise to health problems. The report also gives us an alert on the fact that a large number of young people are drinking and drinking heavily.”
7. Cutaway, Dr. Saxena on the phone
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Shekhar Saxena, Director, WHO Mental Health and Substance Abuse Department:
“Some of the issues that the governments are working on is to implement policies
On making alcohol less eadily available, increasing the price and also having enforcement of rules of drunk driving which are likely to have a major impact on reducing the impact of alcohol.”
9. Tilt up, alcohol campaign poster

STORYLINE:

A new report launched today by the World Health Organization (WHO) says that wider implementation of policies are needed to save lives and reduce the health impact of harmful alcohol drinking.
Harmful use of alcohol results in the death of 2.5 million people annually, causes illness and injury to many more, and increasingly affects younger generations and drinkers in developing countries.
Harmful use of alcohol is defined as excessive use to the point that it causes damage to health and often includes adverse social consequences.

The Global Status Report on Alcohol and Health analyzes available evidence on alcohol consumption, consequences and policy interventions at global, regional and national levels.

Nearly 4 percent of all deaths are related to alcohol. Most alcohol-related deaths are caused by alcohol result from injuries, cancer, cardiovascular diseases and liver cirrhosis. Globally, 6.2 percent of all male deaths are related to alcohol, compared to 1.1% of female deaths. One-in-five men in the Russian Federation and neighbouring countries die due to alcohol-related causes. Globally, 320 000 young people aged 15-29 years die annually, from alcohol-related causes, resulting in 9 percent of all deaths in that age group.

Too few countries use effective policy options to prevent death, disease and injury from alcohol use. From 1999, when WHO first began to report on alcohol policies, at least 34 countries have adopted some type of formal policies to reduce harmful use of alcohol. Restrictions on alcohol marketing and on drink–driving have increased, but there are no clear trends on most preventive measures. Many countries have weak alcohol policies and prevention programmes.

Details

Language: English

Year of Production: 2011

Length: 1:45 mins

Country: United Nations

Directors:

  • Tom Osborne, UNTV - WHO

Producers:

  • Mo Sacirbey