"Heart to Heart":Haiti's Melody/Music & Diplomacy

Web Series, Teens

Heart to Heart:Haiti's Melody/Music & Diplomacy

"Song born from a dream"-If Wyclef Jean, why not these Boys, "Heart to Heart"? The young boys featured in this film report want music and Creole rap to speak for them. It is an evermore frequent complementarity and a crossroads that Wyclef Jean has helped develop for more than a decade. First met Wyclef at UN and Bono sponsored concert to combat poverty. Wyclef has been a frequent participant as UN Goodwill Ambassador events, from United Nations to Global Business Council. Haiti would have been a personal priority even if Wyclef had not had his roots there.

The young boys, they call themselves "Heart to Heart" want to follow in these footsteps. Art and recognition are the most demanding and fickle first step. Hope "Heart to Heart" makes it. Here is a plug for these young "diplomat-artists."

A group of 390 children separated from their parents in Haiti, are being served by this Port-au-Prince residential care centre where they receive housing, hot food, an education, and vocational training.

All while the centre’s staff, whenever possible, works to reunite them with their families.

The centre is working closely with UNICEF to restore the family unit, and to make sure the children with no parents are given a secure, safe environment that prepares them for a productive and rewarding future.

SOUNDBITE (English) Father Jeff Desruisseaux, Centre D’accueil de Carrefour:
“Our vision is not to institutionalize the children, because we know that the best place for the children is not in a centre, it’s in the family.”

UNICEF, which provided educational and recreational supplies to the centre after the earthquake, is increasing its level of support.

SOUNDBITE (English) Denise Ulwor, UNICEF Child Protection Specialist:
“UNICEF is more interested in the centre because the management of the centre made clear to us that this centre should not replace the family and they should do some reunification – or tracing – to get the children reunified with their family.”

Youri Belcomb is a 13 year old boy who has spent the past six years here. He is one of the centre’s top students. He’s also making a name for himself in the centre’s hip-hop group, called “Heart to Heart.”

They sing about improving the country by stepping up and initiating positive change.

SOUNDBITE (Creole) Youri Belcomb, 13 Year-old Boy:
“This song talks about the way people can clean up Haiti, to get rid of the bad and replace it with the good, to make a good Haiti.”

For Youri, the skills he’s learning in the classroom will help him do his part.

SOUNDBITE (Creole) Youri Belcomb, 13 Year-old Boy:
“I will use mathematics to help me with construction. Imagine that I’m building a road or a house, I’ll need to know the numbers, multiplication and everything.”

Youri knows many things, including the idea that building up the children of Haiti is an effective way of rebuilding the future of the country.


Transcripts / Production notes / Scripts

A group of 390 children separated from their parents in Haiti, are being served by this Port-au-Prince residential care centre where they receive housing, hot food, an education, and vocational training.

All while the centre’s staff, whenever possible, works to reunite them with their families.

The centre is working closely with UNICEF to restore the family unit, and to make sure the children with no parents are given a secure, safe environment that prepares them for a productive and rewarding future.

SOUNDBITE (English) Father Jeff Desruisseaux, Centre D’accueil de Carrefour:
“Our vision is not to institutionalize the children, because we know that the best place for the children is not in a centre, it’s in the family.”

UNICEF, which provided educational and recreational supplies to the centre after the earthquake, is increasing its level of support.

SOUNDBITE (English) Denise Ulwor, UNICEF Child Protection Specialist:
“UNICEF is more interested in the centre because the management of the centre made clear to us that this centre should not replace the family and they should do some reunification – or tracing – to get the children reunified with their family.”

Youri Belcomb is a 13 year old boy who has spent the past six years here. He is one of the centre’s top students. He’s also making a name for himself in the centre’s hip-hop group, called “Heart to Heart.”

They sing about improving the country by stepping up and initiating positive change.

SOUNDBITE (Creole) Youri Belcomb, 13 Year-old Boy:
“This song talks about the way people can clean up Haiti, to get rid of the bad and replace it with the good, to make a good Haiti.”

For Youri, the skills he’s learning in the classroom will help him do his part.

SOUNDBITE (Creole) Youri Belcomb, 13 Year-old Boy:
“I will use mathematics to help me with construction. Imagine that I’m building a road or a house, I’ll need to know the numbers, multiplication and everything.”

Youri knows many things, including the idea that building up the children of Haiti is an effective way of rebuilding the future of the country.

Details

Language: French

Year of Production: 2011

Length: 3 mins

Country: Haiti

License

Creative Commons License

"Heart to Heart":Haiti's Melody/Music & Diplomacy by DiplomaticallyIncorrect.org is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 License.


Directors:

  • Muhamed Sacirbey UNTV

Producers:

  • Susan Sacirbey