LIFE AFTER THE TALIBAN WITH VOICEOVER

Politics, Documentaries

LIFE AFTER THE TALIBAN WITH VOICEOVER

A former Taliban fighter in Farah province, talks about his daily life after joining the peace process. Although he stills receives threats from the Taliban for giving up the fight, he says his family have benefitted from their new life.

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Transcripts / Production notes / Scripts

AUDIO TRANSCRIPT

--VOICEOVER--

Once a Taliban commander, Noor Mohammad Jami joined the Afghan Government's peace and reintegration process a year ago.
--SOUNDBITE (PASHTO)--
“I thought it's been 30 years that we Afghans have been killing each other. I look at other countries and they're developing, so why are we destroying our country?”
--VOICEOVER—
Noor lets his son run his shop while he advises the local peace council as well as mediating disputes between people from his village.
--SOUNDBITE (PASHTO)--
“My children are going to school and when they come back, they work in their own shops. I am also solving the problems of my people at home. When there's a problem in my village the elders of my village come to my house and I solve their problems.”
--VOICEOVER--
Noor says he hasn't had any problems with his security, but he has received threatening letters from the Taliban. For that reason, the government allows him to carry a rifle.
--SOUNDBITE (PASHTO)--
“The officials in this province gave me the permit for the weapon which is very good for me, because they know that I will be threatened, so I have to protect myself.”
“Everyone knows that during every meeting I receive many calls from the Taliban commanders. They say you have become a non-muslim and we will pay between 100,000 to 200,000 dollar reward for those who will kill you or kidnap your kids.”

--VOICEOVER--
Noor lives in the western province of Farah. Other former Taliban from the area have been joining the peace process. The former Taliban fighters hand in their heavy weapons and rejoin Afghan society. In return, the local government promises to offer them job opportunities, training and protection from reprisal attacks.

--SOUNDBITE (ENGLISH)--

“They have right to do politics, they have right to learn, they have right to be government employee and they have right to run for the public offices and nobody can bother them.”

--VOICEOVER—
The reintegration programme, launched officially in July last year, has signed up 149 former fighters in Farah and over three and a half thousand country-wide. The number is relatively small compared to estimated fighters on the ground but participants are recruited with the hope of keeping them out of the fight.
For Noor, it’s been successful. He says other fighters should make up their own minds to join the peace process, even if they don't want to work with the government.
--SOUNDBITE (PASHTO)--
“Every Afghan should make a decision by themselves to come back and join the government. And if he wants to work for the government, that’s good, but if not so then he can start a job on his own.”
--VOICEOVER--
This is Ruth Owen, in Afghanistan, for the NATO Channel

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Details

Language: English

Year of Production: 2012

Length: 02:28

Country: Afghanistan