World Cancer Day/13,000,000 a Year Die

Web Series, Health

World Cancer Day/13,000,000 a Year Die

On World Cancer Day, the UN's Atomic Energy Director cites the need to move the battle against cancer to developing countries as well. By 2030, 13,000,000 are projected to die of which 9 million will be from the developing countries. The Agency's Director of Program for Cancer therapy observed: when you go to some of these cancer hospitals in Africa and Asia, and the type of misery you witness, you see that we can't waste a minute.

It is estimated that by 2030 over 13 million people worldwide will die from cancer every year and almost nine million of these deaths will be in the developing world.

SOUNDBITE (English) Yukiya Amano, Director-General, International Atomic Energy Agency:
“I believe that cancer in developing countries should be established as a global health issue. And IAEA can help developing countries in the training of personnel, and in some cases, in the provision of equipment.”

Cancer is on the increase globally. The disease now kills nearly eight million annually, but developing countries are worst hit by the cancer crisis since the resources needed to prevent, diagnose and treat the disease are severely limited or non-existent.

SOUNDBITE (English) Massoud Samiei, Director of the Programme of Action of Cancer Therapy (PACT), International Atomic Energy Agency:
“When you go to some of these cancer hospitals in Africa or Asia and the type of difficulties and sometimes the miseries you see, you see that the mission of the IAEA is so important that there isn’t a minute that we should waste.”

Around 70 percent of cancer deaths already occur in the developing world, although more than a third of cancers can be prevented and a third can be cured if detected early and treated properly.

But many low-income countries do not have prevention and early detection programmes, and not even a single radiation therapy machine, so millions of people who could be successfully treated die every year.

For over forty years, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been assisting developing countries in the field of cancer management.

SOUNDBITE (English) Yukiya Amano, Director-General, International Atomic Energy Agency:
“We are working with other international organizations like WHO as well as with other stakeholders. And world leaders are getting more and more aware of this issue. Developing countries are not alone.”

The IAEA’s expertise lies in radiotherapy, nuclear medicine and radiology and the Agency provides equipment and training and delivers know-how and technical support to help developing countries establish cancer control policies and centres.

It also operates a project that deals specifically with cancer control – the Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy or PACT.

SOUNDBITE (English) Massoud Samiei, Director of the Programme of Action of Cancer Therapy (PACT), International Atomic Energy Agency:
“There is already a movement within the United Nations to address non-communicable diseases, including cancer, to give it more priority. And I think that this is also a significant development. A couple of years ago there was no attention to non-communicable diseases like cancer, heart diseases in developing countries. So that is another thing that gives us hope for the future. And I am sure that we will be successful in the next ten, fifteen years.”

Building on the IAEA’s expertise in radiation medicine, PACT works closely with leading, international organisations to raise awareness of cancer in developing countries and to establish comprehensive national cancer control programmes.

PACT is also addressing the chronic shortage of trained medical staff in the cancer field, the lack of access to radiotherapy facilities and insufficient actions on prevention and early diagnosis.


Transcripts / Production notes / Scripts

It is estimated that by 2030 over 13 million people worldwide will die from cancer every year and almost nine million of these deaths will be in the developing world.

SOUNDBITE (English) Yukiya Amano, Director-General, International Atomic Energy Agency:
“I believe that cancer in developing countries should be established as a global health issue. And IAEA can help developing countries in the training of personnel, and in some cases, in the provision of equipment.”

Cancer is on the increase globally. The disease now kills nearly eight million annually, but developing countries are worst hit by the cancer crisis since the resources needed to prevent, diagnose and treat the disease are severely limited or non-existent.

SOUNDBITE (English) Massoud Samiei, Director of the Programme of Action of Cancer Therapy (PACT), International Atomic Energy Agency:
“When you go to some of these cancer hospitals in Africa or Asia and the type of difficulties and sometimes the miseries you see, you see that the mission of the IAEA is so important that there isn’t a minute that we should waste.”

Around 70 percent of cancer deaths already occur in the developing world, although more than a third of cancers can be prevented and a third can be cured if detected early and treated properly.

But many low-income countries do not have prevention and early detection programmes, and not even a single radiation therapy machine, so millions of people who could be successfully treated die every year.

For over forty years, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been assisting developing countries in the field of cancer management.

SOUNDBITE (English) Yukiya Amano, Director-General, International Atomic Energy Agency:
“We are working with other international organizations like WHO as well as with other stakeholders. And world leaders are getting more and more aware of this issue. Developing countries are not alone.”

The IAEA’s expertise lies in radiotherapy, nuclear medicine and radiology and the Agency provides equipment and training and delivers know-how and technical support to help developing countries establish cancer control policies and centres.

It also operates a project that deals specifically with cancer control – the Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy or PACT.

SOUNDBITE (English) Massoud Samiei, Director of the Programme of Action of Cancer Therapy (PACT), International Atomic Energy Agency:
“There is already a movement within the United Nations to address non-communicable diseases, including cancer, to give it more priority. And I think that this is also a significant development. A couple of years ago there was no attention to non-communicable diseases like cancer, heart diseases in developing countries. So that is another thing that gives us hope for the future. And I am sure that we will be successful in the next ten, fifteen years.”

Building on the IAEA’s expertise in radiation medicine, PACT works closely with leading, international organisations to raise awareness of cancer in developing countries and to establish comprehensive national cancer control programmes.

PACT is also addressing the chronic shortage of trained medical staff in the cancer field, the lack of access to radiotherapy facilities and insufficient actions on prevention and early diagnosis.

Details

Language: English

Year of Production: 2011

Length: 2:30 mins.

Country: United Nations

License

Creative Commons License

World Cancer Day/13,000,000 a Year Die by DiplomaticallyIncorrect.org is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 License.


Directors:

  • Muhamed Sacirbey, UNTV

Producers:

  • Susan Sacirbey